Drumlanrig Castle

Drumlanrig Castle is located in the heart of beautiful Dumfries and Galloway. Although the Castle itself isn’t looked after by the Trust, the stunning collection inside is. Here you can discover over 600 years of family history and the works of art collection over the centuries.

History

Drumlanrig Castle, or the ‘Pink Palace’ as it’s known, is one of the finest examples of late 17th century Renaissance architecture in Scotland. Constructed from distinctive pink sandstone, the Castle first began its life in the 14th century when William Douglas, the son of James, 2nd Earl of Drumlanrig (who died at Otterburn in 1388) became the 1st Laird of Drumlanrig.

Over the hundreds of years that followed, the Douglas family remained close to the monarchy, although it was not without its difficult times. However, Mary Queen of Scots’ son, James VI and I, chose to visit Drumlanrig in 1617 and the royal bond continued to strengthen. William, 3rd Earl of Queensberry, was very loyal to Charles II and was made 1st Duke of Queensberry in 1684. The Castle you see today was built to reflect his new-found status.

Collection

Today, Drumlanrig Castle is home to part of the Buccleuch Art Collection. You’ll find treasures such as Rembrandt’s Old Woman Reading, alongside family portraits by artists such as Thomas Gainsborough, Alan Ramsay and Sir Joshua Reynolds. Landscapes by Paul Sandby and the Dutch masters, and cartoons by Rowlandson can also be seen.

The Buccleuch Collection is particularly renowned for its furniture and silver. Inside the Castle are two great cabinets by the 17th century French master, Andre Charles Boulle which bring the spirit of Louis XIV to the grand drawing room. Along with tapestry, precious fabrics and porcelain, all embraced within the atmosphere of a family home, a visit to Drumlanrig is a rare art historical experience.